Reworks Agora

Reworks Agora is a new project by Reworks.  A gathering platform which will host discussion panels, music performances, screenings and more. Its launch is set for Wednesday September 14th in Thessaloniki, Greece. Reworks Agora will take place in Thessaloniki Music Hall and aims to bring together experts from Greece and abroad (artists, entrepreneurs and researchers) to present future initiatives around music, cinematography, technology and cultural entrepreneurship. It aims to be a platform where the audience can discover emerging topics, artists and create possibilities. Integrated to Reworks that follows right after, Reworks Agora will introduce its audience to the digital culture and to relevant creative industries.

In more than a decade of existence, Reworks has become the most important and long-lived electronic music festival in Greece, introducing new music forms, presenting upcoming talents and well-established ones and has become Greece’s premier electronic music gathering. Agora in ancient Greece was the open space of assembly, the place where citizens could gather and find solutions for important matters. Reworks Agora looks forward to bring back this ethos. A place of forward thinking on creativity where the audience can discover emerging topics, initiatives and artists that will inspire debate for future developments in cultural industry.

In 2016, Reworks Agora participates in We are Europe program and will host events in collaboration with Elevate – Discourse & Activism as well as Resonate Conference. We are happy to welcome those two important festivals with two discussion panels and two artist performances.

SCHEDULE

Creative Industries: Mapping the future

FOYER M2

  • 14.00 – 14.15 Registration

 

MORIS SALTIEL 2 

  • 14.15 Welcome
  • 14.30 – 16.00 1st Panel Discussion —  Elevate Discourse & Activism presents
    Un-Chain the Art
    How technological advancements and the spirit of innovation are changing the way artists relate to their works and their audience
  • 16.00 – 16.15 Break
  • 16.15 – 17.45 2nd Panel Discussion — Resonate Conference presents
    Public funding, Public culture, Public debate: New Strategies of commissioning for art works
  • 17.15 – 18.30 Documentary Screening: The Sound of Belgium (*free entrance)
  • 17.45 – 18.15 Break
  • 18.15 – 19.45 3rd Panel Discussion
    Peeling the layers between contemporary music production and distribution of creative capital
  • 19.45 – 20.00 Break
  • 20.00 – 21.00 Concert: Lambert
  • 21.00 – 21.15 Break
  • 21.15 – 22.15 Concert: Federico Albanese

PANELS

Un-Chain the Art

Un-Chain the Art: How technological advancements and the spirit of innovation are changing the way artists relate to their works and their audience

Blockchain technology is what enables Bitcoin to allow financial exchanges – without central entities like banks acting as middlemen. Bitcoin is a decentralized database where users follow a protocol to record the ownership of tokens of value and their exchange. An imaginative person will jump to extend the metaphors of such a system to other domains, and of course to the music and art world. A music or artworks blockchain would be a single place to publish all the information about who made what, without having to trust a third-party organization.

Creative Commons on the other hand has been described as being at the forefront of the copyleft movement, which seeks to support the building of a richer public domain by providing an alternative to the automatic “all rights reserved” copyright. Creative Commons has a real world interest in the developments of the blockchain world. They are potentially a means of conveying license information, identifying media just as accurately as a digital fingerprint.

This session with panelists and their innovative projects from this field aims to foster a better understanding of the challenges and potentials of these rather new technological developments.

Speakers

 

Μoderator


This activity is part of the We Are Europe programme and has been curated by Elevate Festival.

Public funding, Public culture, Public debate: New Strategies of commissioning for art works

Public funding, Public culture, Public debate: New Strategies of commissioning for art works

In a world driven by globalisation and technological change, the economic, political and social conditions of artistic labour has shifted significantly over the past 5 years. Artists, curators, and cultural practitioners are faced with complex economic and political conditions when constructing critical accounts of public culture. This panel brings together leading cultural practitioners who are at the forefront of exploring how advanced technologies, and the Internet are shaping the society we live and work in. Faced with diminishing public funding their approach to commissioning and working with artists are of crucial importance for the development of public discourse surrounding the use of technology. But how do they operate within the blurred boundaries between art, industry and economics, and what strategies do they employ that allow for the continuous questioning of these complexities, and the maintenance of the edge of technology? How do national and European policies for culture shape the commissioning and development of artistic work? How do success and failure within these infrastructures affect the future approaches to supporting and commissioning artistic practice?

Speakers

 

Moderator


This activity is part of the We Are Europe programme and has been curated by Resonate Festival.

Peeling the layers between contemporary music production and distribution of creative capital

Peeling the layers between contemporary music production and distribution of creative capital

Music has been part of human culture for more than 3.000 years. But 20 years ago, music went digital. As today’s music industry continues to evolve, the conversation about the process in music creation needs to progress accordingly. This informative panel looks at the changing landscape and explores the ways in which technology and new forms of engagement leveraged to transform the industry. Digital disruption has brought a change in the artist – fan relationship, bringing them closer to each other than they ever been before and at the same time the classic channels of distribution of creative capital find a new path to pave.

Points of view in this A-list panel range from creative creation to production and from promotion and distribution of music content to its consumption in digital platforms and live stages. Don’t miss the chance to hear your favorite artists and industry insiders sharing stories, strategies and insights on how to amplify the impact of the music industry in the future.

Speakers

 

Moderator

PERFORMANCES

Elevate Festival Presents

Resonate Festival Presents

SCREENING

The Sound of Belgium

Reworks and In-Edit presents

TSOB_A2_02

The Sound of Belgium

  • Direction: Jozef Devillé
  • Year: 2012
  • Country: Belgium
  • Duration: 85 min.
  • Original Language: Dutch, French, English
  • Website: http://www.tsob.be
  • Producers: Steven Dhoedt, Gert Van Berckelaer

 

Belgians “work hard and party harder.” A clubber travels through the contagious yet obscure Belgian club scene, from ‘20s Decap organs to ‘90s hardcore, passing through ‘60s popcorn and ‘80s New Beat on the road to world domination. A clubland all of its own making.

the_sound_of_belgium_jozef_deville_04

You may well ask: What the hell has a documentary about Belgian music got to do with me? At first glance, nothing, right? Belgium’s nothing more than mussels and fries and Manneken Pis, you say. Crass error! The Belgians, as they tell us here: “work hard and party harder.” Welcome to a hilarious ride or trip (in the techno sense of the word), through the nation’s contagious clubbing culture. The film kicks off in 1815, with the Battle of Waterloo (at full pelt), and reveals the primitive desire of the Belgian people to dance until dawn. We see all the clubs, genres and scenes (knowing that some of them will end up taking over the world). Get down on the Flemish dance floor, dance with the Decap organs, dancehalls and roadhouse bars of the 1940s, cruise through the popcorn of the ‘60s (a kinda home-brewed northern soul scene, but with the pitch lowered?), discover Front 242 and then the New Beat revolution (also with the pitch lowered!), the rebirth of local techno (which influenced the English raves), and the rise of not-for-the-faint-hearted native Hardcore. Gripping stuff. We’ll never see Belgium in the same light again.

346694943_1280x720

*free entrance

logoNEW_greece_S